AOC-Yoho-Resignation Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., speaks on the House floor on Capitol Hill in Washington. Rep. Ocasio-Cortez's impassioned remarks on the House floor against the vulgar words of a male colleague and a toxic culture that allows it, have resonated with women who say such language has been tacitly accepted for far too long. Rep. Nydia Velázquez, D-N.Y., is seated right.
Image via House Television via AP, File

After Florida Rep. Ted Yoho delivered a non-apology to New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, it seemed like he wouldn’t have to face repercussions for verbally assaulting her — that is until now.

On July 23, the Hispanic Caucus signed a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Republican Leader Rep. Kevin Owen McCarthy asking them to denounce the verbal assault that Rep. Ted Yoho (R-FL) launched against Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY). Aside from that letter, Rep. Yoho — who is not up for re-election this year — has hardly faced repercussions for the offensive comments against the freshman congresswoman. However, two days after Rep. Ocasio-Cortez issued a poignant speech about Rep. Yoho’s verbal assault, a Christian non-partisan organization has released the Florida congressman of his duties. 

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Bread for the World, a Christian organization committed to alleviating hunger and poverty through sound public policies, asked Rep. Yoho to resign from his position on their board of directors, and he accepted. 

“We believe that Rep. Ted Yoho’s recent actions and words as reported in the media are not reflective of the ethical standards expected of members of our Board of Directors,” the group said in a statement on July 25. 

“Bread for the World met with Rep. Yoho on Friday, and he has resigned from the board of Bread. During that conversation, we reaffirmed our joint commitment to expanding opportunity for men, women, and children around the world and thanked Rep. Yoho for his commitment to foreign aid effectiveness and transparency. Despite these areas of agreement, Bread sought his resignation as an action that reaffirms our commitment to coming alongside women and people of color, nationally and globally, as they continue to lead us to a more racially inclusive and equitable world.”

The organization went on to conclude, “During this critical time in our nation in which millions depend on U.S. government leadership and improved public policies that center on those most impacted by the COVID-19 crisis, it is our hope and prayer that government leaders will find the moral courage and political will to foster healing and civil dialogue that leads to real structural change in our country and globally.”

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Rep. Yoho has yet to comment on his resignation from Bread for the World, or on Rep. Ocasio-Cortez’s speech. 

On July 25, the New York City congresswoman presented a powerful speech about Rep. Yoho’s disrespect and how verbal attacks against women by powerful men are frequent. 

“I am here because I have to show my parents that I am their daughter and that they did not raise me to accept abuse from men,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

“I am someone’s daughter too,” Rep. Ocasio-Cortez emotionally said on the House Floor. “My father, thankfully, is not alive to see how Mr. Yoho treated his daughter. My mother got to see Mr. Yoho’s disrespect on the floor of this House towards me on television, and I am here because I have to show my parents that I am their daughter and that they did not raise me to accept abuse from men.”