day-of-the-dead-celebrate-virtually An organ grinder with his face painted as a skull for Day of the Dead, wearing a face shield, Oct. 27, 2020 in Mexico City, Mexico.
Image via Ricardo Castelan Cruz / Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

With so many lives lost to COVID-19, Latinos still want to honor their loved ones in this traditional way. 

Day of the Dead is a special time for Latinos in Latin American and the US. However, this year, amid a pandemic that is severely impacting Latinos, celebrating among friends and family isn’t safe. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is also suggesting alternative ways to honor Day of the Dead rather than socialize in large crowds. Yet with so many lives lost to COVID-19, Latinos still want to honor their loved ones in this traditional way. 

RELATED: Why the Day of the Dead Is More Important Than Ever

Day of the Dead is a festive and also prideful holiday for Latinos, so we’ve included ways for you to celebrate this rich and colorful two-day event virtually. 

Virtual Día de Muertos Xicágo

When: 12 p.m.(CST), Nov. 1

Presented by the National Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago, their virtual festivities will feature live musical performances by Los Gallos and Mariachi Nuevo Tapatio, sugar skull, face painting demos, and fun Día de Muertos art activities to help you decorate your Day of the Dead altars. Spend the day at home with your family and make an ofrenda (altar), cook a delicious meal, or watch the museum’s entertaining segments online. Cost: Free. 

Click here to register. 

“Sólo un poco aquí: Day of the Dead” 

When: Now through Dec. 18. 

The National Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago also has a Day of the Dead exhibition that can be experienced virtually. “Sólo un poco aquí: Day of the Dead” pays tribute to and remembers the numerous individuals from the Latino community, Mexico, the US, and the entire world who have died from COVID-19. Check out the new installations, paintings, and prints created by local artists for the 34th annual Day of the Dead exhibition. 

There will also be works of art in various media from the growing National Museum of Mexican Art Permanent Collection. These works created by Mexican artists from both sides of the border reveal their interest in preserving and participating in one of the most influential living celebrations from Mexico, which over time has transcended borders. Cost: free.

Click here for more information. 

Day of the Dead In Mexico
Offering in the food area of the La Lagunilla Market in Mexico City, with candles, marigold flowers, sugar skulls, and catrinas, on the eve of Día de Muertos in Mexico. (Photo by Gerardo Vieyra/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

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Traditions of Mexico’s Day of the Dead

When: Oct. 31-Dec. 1 

Presented by AirBnB online experiences, your host will show you all the elements of Day of the Dead. Learn about altars, its history, and meaning, and make the famous and colorful Mexican “papel picado”; There will also be a class on creating a sugar skull and a lovely gift at the end. All this with simple ingredients you can find in your kitchen. Cost: $20 per person. 

Click here for more information. 

Make a Traditional Mexican Piñata

When: Now through Jan. 1

Presented by AirBnB online experiences, learn how to make a traditional Mexican piñata while you chat about this distinctive craft’s origin and its participation in the Mexican culture. Participants learn the basic technique of its structure, move onto its colorful decoration, and culminate with the ceremonies in which it plays an important role. Cost: $14 per person.

Click here for more information. 

Persons Celebrating Day Of The Dead
A person with their skull face make-up to celebrate the Mexican traditions of Day of the Dead (Día de Muertos) seen in downtown on October 27, 2020 in Mexico City, Mexico. (Ricardo Castelan Cruz / Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

El Museo’s Día de los Muertos 2020

When: Nov 1-2

El Museo del Barrio in New York City offers a slew of virtual events for Day of the Dead. Starting on Nov. 1, people can virtually experience an Opening Ceremony by Danza Azteca, learn how to create an altar at home, and play Lotería, presented by the Calpulli Mexican Dance Company. Artist Polina Porras also offers a talk on the mythological land of Mictlān, known by the Aztecs as “the Place of the Dead,” inspired by her 2006 book. The Calpulli Mexican Dance Company will also host a special dance performance. Cost: free. 

Click here for more information. 

Sweet Treats With a Mexico City Chef 

When: Now through Jan. 1

Presented by AirBnB online experiences, learn how to make three Mexican desserts with a professional instructor and culinary artist who will share recipes with you. Throughout the experience, the chef will guide you through each delicious dessert, virtually cooking alongside you, and helping you every step of the way. Cost: $22. 

Click here for more information. 

SOMArts Cultural Center’s Living Legacies: Día de los Muertos 2020 Virtual Experience

When: On view now.

SOMArts Cultural Center is known for creating remarkable and emotional altars dedicated to social justice issues. This year artists are taking on police violence toward Black communities, the COVID–19 pandemic, housing rights, Medicare for all, and worker protections. For this year’s exhibition, SOMArts Cultural Center is offering a virtual gallery, a nicho workshop, and an exhibition tour. Cost: Free. 

Click here for more information. 

Eve Of Mexican Day of The Dead Celebrations
A woman at an outdoor market on the occasion of the Mexican Day of the Dead celebrations on Oct. 29, 2020 in Mexico City, Mexico. (Leonardo Casas / Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

Día de los Muertos at Forest Lawn

When: Noon-2 p.m., Nov. 1 (PST)

The Day of the Dead tradition continues at Forest Lawn Memorial-Parks and Mortuaries with a virtual celebration of the dearly departed. The event will be streamed on Forest Lawn’s Facebook page. The event will include folkloric dance performances by Ballet Folklorico Internacional, music by Mariachi Juvenil Herencia Mexicana, and a puppet show by the famous Bob Baker Marionette Theater troupe. There will be altars, and six-foot-tall Catrina sculptures will make an appearance too.

Click here for more information. 

Pasadena Tournament of Roses Día de los Muertos Art Competition 

When: Winners announced on Nov. 2

Contestants from the Pasadena Tournament of Roses Día de los Muertos Art Competition have already entered, and now it’s time to see the winners! The competition featured artists between the ages of 4 and 18, and their entries included anything relatd to Day of the Dead, including altars, face painting, making an original sugar skull and making a floral arrangement. 

Click here for more information.